Susan Marie Molloy

Life in the Oasis


5 Comments

Old Stogie

Old Stogie
By Susan Marie Molloy

The Corona sits between his teeth,
Its ashes hanging together for dear life,
Grey and two inches long.

The smoke imbeds within the fibers
Of his ribbed sleeveless undershirt,
Now yellow and two sizes too small.

The basement lies damp with mildew—
And dark, save for the plastic Tiffany lamp
Hanging above his rusty desk.

The Corona sits between his teeth,
Its grey ashes collapsing on his lap,
Posting his blog, sharing his grandma’s recipes.

—From ©“Gallery Night: Stories in the Dark” by Susan Marie Molloy

Advertisements


2 Comments

Date Night: At the Movies – “Darkest Hour” and Canned Cheese Spray

When it was time to take a break from the week’s routine, my beau and I headed out for lunch the other day. Though the weather was grey and lightly drizzling, we opted to sit outside on the veranda:

We watched a few golfers get those last couple of balls on the course right before the deluge.

Our meals were good and not so good – my beau’s sausage-pepper-and-onion sandwich on Italian bread was very enjoyable, he told me. I had a cup of mushroom-beef soup, which was outstandingly good (I want the recipe!), but my plate of nachos was something to be desired. It was the canned chili and canned cheese spray that, well, overwhelmed the chips and jalapenos, and it was dreadful.

Afterwards, we went to the show and caught the matinee of “Darkest Hour,” which is a re-telling of the first few weeks of Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s tenure. While Hitler was ramming his way through Europe and getting closer to England, Churchill had his battles with members of Parliament and his poor reputation from the Gallipoli Campaign (1915-16). In a nutshell, many people at the time thought of him as delusional and crazy for seeing that the Allies were losing (at that point), and his refusal to negotiate for peace. However, after a little stumbling and forthright determination, plus much-needed cheerleading, he was confident the public would see that the Allies could win the war.

This was a pretty good movie, and the actor (Gary Oldman) who played Churchill did a great job (although the makeup department made him to look older than what I remember Churchill looking like on film during the early days of World War II). Clementine Hozier Churchill, his wife (played by Kristin Scott), looked so much like Wallis Simpson, that I could see her playing that part if there was a movie made about Edward VIII’s abdication in 1936.

In “Darkest Hour,” there are a couple of events that are what I call “Hollywood’s Artistic License,” such as when Elizabeth Layton Nel began her job as Churchill’s secretary, and his little jaunt through the subway to meet-and-greet the public. Otherwise, the movie did an excellent job showing that Churchill had a rough road to hoe with little cooperation (at first) with Parliament and his past reputation. Yet, as all great leaders learn to do, he did what was right for Great Britain and the ultimately the Allies, and he eventually won over most.

I recommend this film for its close historical accuracy, period costumes, and grand film set.

I don’t recommend the plate of nachos at the restaurant where my beau and I ate, though.

©Susan Marie Molloy and all works within.


2 Comments

Morning Meditation: A Trio of Florida Pine Cones

While our visit to Dade Battlefield State Park in Bushnell, Florida, I found a trio of strategically-fallen pine cones. I think they are pretty, even without a bank of fluffy white snow:

Articles in the Dade Battlefield State Park Series by Susan Marie Molloy
Dade Battlefield State Park: Morning Meditation: Fan Palm
Dade Battlefield State Park: Nature
Dade Battlefield State Park: Dade’s Battle!
Dade Battlefield State Park: Up Close with the Seminoles, Soldiers, and Trappers
Dade Battlefield State Park: Outtakes and Updates
Dade Battlefield State Park: Going Home
Dade Battlefield State Park: Morning Meditation: A Trio of Florida Pine Cones


1 Comment

Dade Battlefield State Park: Going Home

The afternoon was ending and getting chilly again. We spent the day at the Dade Battlefield State Park to watch the annual Dade Battle reenactment. We took a leisurely walk in the forest, ate lunch in a gazebo, and met some of the Seminole and soldier reenactors.

It was time to leave and return home.

We found the area where the actual battle occurred and walked down King’s Road (which is the road the soldiers used when the battle began).

King’s Road

King’s Road

The state park is keeping this area as it looked in 1835 as best as possible.

I spotted a bridge:

An encampment of soldiers along the way:

Monuments denoting where the officers fell:

We took the back roads to see new country. People raise cattle in this part of Florida:

When we got home, I was thirsty, so I dug into my purse for the ginger ale I saved from lunch. It was a little cold and the carbonation tasted good.

Not a product endorsement.

This is last in the series of my articles, “Dade Battlefield State Park.” I hope you enjoyed this.  To read more about this important battle that led to the Second Seminole Wars in Florida, visit the Dade Battlefield Society website.

Morning Meditation: Fan Palm
Dade Battlefield State Park: Nature
Dade Battlefield State Park: Dade’s Battle!
Dade Battlefield State Park: Up Close with the Seminoles, Soldiers, and Trappers
Dade Battlefield State Park: Outtakes and Updates
Dade Battlefield State Park: Going Home
Morning Meditation: A Trio of Florida Pines

©Susan Marie Molloy and all works within.


1 Comment

Dade Battlefield State Park: Outtakes and Updates

While on our trip to Bushnell, Florida to observe the annual Dade Battle reenactment, it wasn’t without a little humor and surprising observations.

Remember Kilt Man I wrote about in Dade Battlefield: Nature? As you might recall, as my beau and I sat at a picnic table and ate our lunch, we couldn’t help but hear a very loud talking man two tables over. He was regaling and bragging about his encounters and experiences with kilts. The woman to whom he was giving his monologue, kept giggling. My beau, on to Kilt Man’s bravado and time-worn faux tale of old ladies with umbrellas trying to seek a peek under his kilts (such an old, old joke) walked up to his table, and asked:

“I couldn’t help but hearing you, and as a proud Irishman, I’d like to ask you if you know what’s under an Irishman kilt.”

Kilt Man mumbled the time-worn, old punchline to the joke.

“No, sir, it’s the same thing, only bigger,” was my beau’s snappy comeback.

The day’s reenactment activities were all about authenticity and accuracy. I took this photograph, pleased with the setting. When I uploaded it onto my computer, I spotted the 19th century Seminole eating his lunch from a 21st century Styrofoam container:


A white horse hides behind some brush, but the Seminoles are even more hidden:


I walked over to gaze at some real coonskin caps:

I looked at a necklace made from a real racoon paw and one made from an alligator paw. I didn’t take photos of them, but they were interesting nonetheless.

Under one of the gazebos, a lady was playing a dulcimer with wooden spoons, while a man was playing a one-string washtub.


The back of this Seminole’s dress fascinated me. Then I saw his 19th century pistol:


We spoke to this Seminole, and we asked about his tartan cap. He told us that not only did the Seminole trade with the Spanish, English, and French, they also did business with the Scots-Irish: Therefore, tartans caps and other European commodities made their way to Seminole culture and fashion:

We spied this Seminole on horseback holding a rifle:


The afternoon was ending and getting chilly again. It was time to leave and return home.

Tomorrow: Going Home

Articles from the Dade Battlefield State Park by Susan Marie Molloy
Dade Battlefield State Park: Morning Meditation: Fan Palm
Dade Battlefield State Park: Nature
Dade Battlefield State Park: Dade’s Battle!
Dade Battlefield State Park: Up Close with the Seminoles, Soldiers, and Trappers
Dade Battlefield State Park: Outtakes and Updates
Dade Battlefield State Park: Going Home

©Susan Marie Molloy and all works within.